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ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE ROCKHOUSE

GABLEDHOUSE

Low-energy family house. The house concept is based on basic zones, well legible at first sight: quiet, social and backrooms zones. Each of these zones is understood as a separate section linked smoothly to the next. Every section seems to be made by a separate house wedged into another, resulting in a single, articulated structure. This concept is supported by the way the three zones are shifted and by the different width of the social section and different height of the individual houses. Saddle roofs are exposed throughout the interior that, depending on the “social significance” change their sloping. The lowest height is in the backroom, and the space subsequently rises to reach its maximum possible height in the social section, only to drop again in the rest zone of the bedrooms. The surface of the entire house is made of spruce shingles (both on vertical planes and sloping roofs). This uniform material makes the house uniform and lets only its shifts in mass stand out. It does not stress any edge or surface in any way. Thanks to the small shingle size, the house has the right scale and varying single sizes free the house from unnatural machine-like precision and makes the impression of a hand-made artifact.

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